Vitamin K is an important nutrient the plays a critical role in blood clotting and bone and also heart health.

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While vitamin K deficiency is rare, less than optimal intake might impair your health over time. Poor intake may cause bleeding, weaken your bones and also potentially boost your hazard of occurring heart an illness (1, 2).

For this reason, you need to make certain to get all the vitamin K her body requires. A daily value (DV) of 120 mcg need to prevent insufficiency in most people.

This short article lists 20 foods items that provide high amounts of vitamin K. Additionally, it includes 5 lists of vitamin K resources categorized by food group.


20 foods High in Vitamin K

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Vitamin K is a team of compounds divided into two groups: vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) and vitamin K2 (menaquinone).

Vitamin K1, the many common form of vitamin K, is mainly discovered in plant-sourced foods, specifically dark, leafy eco-friendly vegetables. Vitamin K2, ~ above the other hand, is only uncovered in animal-sourced foods and also fermented plant foods, such as natto.

The following 20 foods are an excellent sources the vitamin K. For optimal health, include some of lock in your daily diet.

1. Kale (cooked) — 443% DV per serving

Half a cup: 531 mcg (443% DV) 100 grams: 817 mcg (681% DV)

2. Mustard Greens (cooked) — 346% DV every serving

Half a cup: 415 mcg (346% DV) 100 grams: 593 mcg (494% DV)

3. Swiss Chard (raw) — 332% DV every serving

1 leaf: 398 mcg (332% DV) 100 grams: 830 mcg (692% DV)

4. Collard Greens (cooked) — 322% DV every serving

Half a cup: 386 mcg (322% DV) 100 grams: 407 mcg (339% DV)

5. Natto — 261% DV per serving

1 ounce: 313 mcg (261% DV) 100 grams: 1,103 mcg (920% DV)

6. Spinach (raw) — 121% DV every serving

1 cup: 145 mcg (121% DV) 100 grams: 483 mcg (402% DV)

7. Broccoli (cooked) — 92% DV every serving

Half a cup: 110 mcg (92% DV) 100 grams: 141 mcg (118% DV)

8. Brussels Sprouts (cooked) — 91% DV every serving

Half a cup: 109 mcg (91% DV) 100 grams: 140 mcg (117% DV)

9. Beef Liver — 60% DV per serving

1 slice: 72 mcg (60% DV) 100 grams: 106 mcg (88% DV)

10. Pork Chops — 49% DV every serving

3 ounces: 59 mcg (49% DV) 100 grams: 69 mcg (57% DV)

11. Chicken — 43% DV per serving

3 ounces: 51 mcg (43% DV) 100 grams: 60 mcg (50% DV)

12. Goose Liver paste — 40% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 48 mcg (40% DV) 100 grams: 369 mcg (308% DV)

13. Green Beans (cooked) — 25% DV per serving

Half a cup: 30 mcg (25% DV) 100 grams: 48 mcg (40% DV)

14. Prunes — 24% DV per serving

5 pieces: 28 mcg (24% DV) 100 grams: 60 mcg (50% DV)

15. Kiwi — 23% DV every serving

1 fruit: 28 mcg (23% DV) 100 grams: 40 mcg (34% DV)

16. Soybean Oil — 21% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 25 mcg (21% DV) 100 grams: 184 mcg (153% DV)

17. Hard Cheeses — 20% DV per serving

1 ounce: 25 mcg (20% DV) 100 grams: 87 mcg (72% DV)

18. Avocado — 18% DV every serving

Half, medium: 21 mcg (18% DV) 100 grams: 21 mcg (18% DV)

19. Eco-friendly Peas (cooked) — 17% DV every serving

Half a cup: 21 mcg (17% DV) 100 grams: 26 mcg (22% DV)

20. Soft cheeses — 14% DV every serving

1 ounce: 17 mcg (14% DV) 100 grams: 59 mcg (49% DV)


The finest sources the vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) are dark, leafy environment-friendly vegetables. In fact, the prefix “phyllo” describes leaves.

1. Kale (cooked) — 443% DV per serving

Half a cup: 531 mcg (443% DV) 100 grams: 817 mcg (681% DV)

2. Mustard Greens (cooked) — 346% DV per serving

Half a cup: 415 mcg (346% DV) 100 grams: 593 mcg (494% DV)

3. Swiss Chard (raw) — 332% DV per serving

1 leaf: 398 mcg (332% DV) 100 grams: 830 mcg (692% DV)

4. Collard Greens (cooked) — 322% DV every serving

Half a cup: 386 mcg (322% DV) 100 grams: 407 mcg (339% DV)

5. Beet Greens (cooked) — 290% DV per serving

Half a cup: 349 mcg (290% DV) 100 grams: 484 mcg (403% DV)

6. Parsley (fresh) — 137% DV per serving

1 sprig: 164 mcg (137% DV) 100 grams: 1,640 mcg (1,367% DV)

7. Spinach (raw) — 121% DV per serving

1 cup: 145 mcg (121% DV) 100 grams: 483 mcg (402% DV)

8. Broccoli (cooked) — 92% DV every serving

Half a cup: 110 mcg (92% DV) 100 grams: 141 mcg (118% DV)

9. Brussels Sprouts (cooked) — 91% DV every serving

Half a cup: 109 mcg (91% DV) 100 grams: 140 mcg (117% DV)

10. Cabbage (cooked) — 68% DV every serving

Half a cup: 82 mcg (68% DV) 100 grams: 109 mcg (91% DV)


Fatty meats and liver are fantastic sources the vitamin K2, though the contents varies by the animal’s diet and may it is in different in between regions or producers.

Information ~ above the vitamin K2 content of animal-sourced foods is incomplete, yet a couple of studies have actually been excellent (3, 4, 5, 6, 7).

Below are 10 foods items that provide great or moderate amounts of vitamin K2.

1. Beef Liver — 60% DV every serving

1 slice: 72 mcg (60% DV) 100 grams: 106 mcg (88% DV)

2. Pork Chops — 49% DV every serving

3 ounces: 59 mcg (49% DV) 100 grams: 69 mcg (57% DV)

3. Chicken — 43% DV every serving

3 ounces: 51 mcg (43% DV) 100 grams: 60 mcg (50% DV)

4. Goose Liver dough — 40% DV every serving

1 tablespoon: 48 mcg (40% DV) 100 grams: 369 mcg (308% DV)

5. Bacon — 25% DV every serving

3 ounces: 30 mcg (25% DV) 100 grams: 35 mcg (29% DV)

6. Soil Beef — 7% DV per serving

3 ounces: 8 mcg (7% DV) 100 grams: 9.4 mcg (8% DV)

7. Pork Liver — 6% DV per serving

3 ounces: 6.6 mcg (6% DV) 100 grams: 7.8 mcg (7% DV)

8. Duck chest — 4% DV per serving

3 ounces: 4.7 mcg (4% DV) 100 grams: 5.5 mcg (5% DV)

9. Beef kidney — 4% DV every serving

3 ounces: 4.9 mcg (4% DV) 100 grams: 5.7 mcg (5% DV)

10. Chicken Liver — 3% DV per serving

1 ounce: 3.6 mcg (3% DV) 100 grams: 13 mcg (11% DV)


Dairy foods and eggs are decent sources of vitamin K2.

Just like meat, your vitamin content counts on the animal’s diet, and also values vary by an ar or producer.

1. Tough Cheeses — 20% DV per serving

1 ounce: 25 mcg (20% DV) 100 grams: 87 mcg (72% DV)

2. Jarlsberg Cheese — 19% DV per serving

1 slice: 22 mcg (19% DV) 100 grams: 80 mcg (66% DV)

3. Soft cheeses — 14% DV every serving

1 ounce: 17 mcg (14% DV) 100 grams: 59 mcg (49% DV)

4. Edam Cheese — 11% DV every serving

1 slice: 13 mcg (11% DV) 100 grams: 49 mcg (41% DV)

5. Blue Cheese — 9% DV per serving

1 ounce: 10 mcg (9% DV) 100 grams: 36 mcg (30% DV)

6. Egg Yolk — 5% DV every serving

1 large: 5.8 mcg (5% DV) 100 grams: 34 mcg (29% DV)

7. Cheddar — 3% DV every serving

1 ounce: 3.7 mcg (3% DV) 100 grams: 13 mcg (11% DV)

8. Totality Milk — 3% DV per serving

1 cup: 3.2 mcg (3% DV) 100 grams: 1.3 mcg (1% DV)

9. Butter — 2% DV every serving

1 tablespoon: 3 mcg (2% DV) 100 grams: 21 mcg (18% DV)

10. Cream — 2% DV every serving

2 tablespoons: 2.7 mcg (2% DV) 100 grams: 9 mcg (8% DV)


Fruits normally do not contain as lot vitamin K1 as leafy green vegetables, yet a few provide kind amounts.

1. Prunes — 24% DV every serving

5 pieces: 28 mcg (24% DV) 100 grams: 60 mcg (50% DV)

2. Kiwi — 23% DV per serving

1 fruit: 28 mcg (23% DV) 100 grams: 40 mcg (34% DV)

3. Avocado — 18% DV per serving

Half, medium: 21 mcg (18% DV) 100 grams: 21 mcg (18% DV)

4. Blackberries — 12% DV every serving

Half a cup: 14 mcg (12% DV) 100 grams: 20 mcg (17% DV)

5. Blueberries — 12% DV per serving

Half a cup: 14 mcg (12% DV) 100 grams: 19 mcg (16% DV)

6. Pomegranate — 12% DV every serving

Half a cup: 14 mcg (12% DV) 100 grams: 16 mcg (14% DV)

7. Figs (dried) — 6% DV per serving

5 pieces: 6.6 mcg (6% DV) 100 grams: 16 mcg (13% DV)

8. Tomatoes (sun-dried) — 4% DV per serving

5 pieces: 4.3 mcg (4% DV) 100 grams: 43 mcg (36% DV)

9. Grapes — 3% DV per serving

10 grapes: 3.5 mcg (3% DV) 100 grams: 15 mcg (12% DV)

10. Red Currants — 3% DV every serving

1 ounce: 3.1 mcg (3% DV) 100 grams: 11 mcg (9% DV)


Some legumes and also nuts administer decent amounts of vitamin K1 yet generally provide much less than leafy green vegetables.

1. Environment-friendly Beans (cooked) — 25% DV every serving

Half a cup: 30 mcg (25% DV) 100 grams: 48 mcg (40% DV)

2. Eco-friendly Peas (cooked) — 17% DV per serving

Half a cup: 21 mcg (17% DV) 100 grams: 26 mcg (22% DV)

3. Soybeans (cooked) — 13% DV every serving

Half a cup: 16 mcg (13% DV) 100 grams: 33 mcg (28% DV)

4. Sprouted Mung bean (cooked) — 12% DV every serving

Half a cup: 14 mcg (12% DV) 100 grams: 23 mcg (19% DV)

5. Cashews — 8% DV every serving

1 ounce: 9.7 mcg (8% DV) 100 grams: 34 mcg (28% DV)

6. Red Kidney beans (cooked) — 6% DV per serving

Half a cup: 7.4 mcg (6% DV) 100 grams: 8.4 mcg (7% DV)

7. Hazelnuts — 3% DV every serving

1 ounce: 4 mcg (3% DV) 100 grams: 14 mcg (12% DV)

8. Pine Nuts — 1% DV every serving

10 nuts: 0.9 mcg (1% DV) 100 grams: 54 mcg (45% DV)

9. Pecans — 1% DV per serving

1 ounce: 1 mcg (1% DV) 100 grams: 3.5 mcg (3% DV)

10. Walnuts — 1% DV every serving

1 ounce: 0.8 mcg (1% DV) 100 grams: 2.7 mcg (2% DV)


The wealthiest sources the vitamin K1 space dark, leafy environment-friendly vegetables. For example, just fifty percent a cup of kale provides about 443% that the day-to-day value.

To gain the many out the the vitamin K in kale and also other plant foods, consider eating them with some fat or oil. This is since vitamin K is fat-soluble and may be much better absorbed when merged with fat.

Vitamin K2 is only uncovered in animal-sourced foods items and certain fermented dishes. Tiny amounts are also produced by your gut bacteria (8).

Natto, a Japanese dish made native fermented soybeans, is one of the best sources that vitamin K2. Other good sources encompass meat, liver and also cheese (9).

Evidence argues that the metabolism and functions of vitamin K1 and K2 are slightly different, though this is not yet fully understood (10, 11, 12).

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At the moment, diet guidelines execute not distinguish in between the two. However, that is probably a great idea to encompass both of them in your diet.